Friday, November 15, 2013


A poem wherein I find comfort this day
I think sometimes of the possible glamour of death
that it might be wonderful to be
lost and happy inside the green grass -
or to be the green grass! -
or, maybe, the pink rose, or the blue iris,
or the affable daisy, or the twirled vine,
looping its way skyward - that it might be perfectly peaceful
to be the shining lake, or the hurrying, athletic river,
or the dark shoulders of the trees
where the thrush each evening weeps himself into an ecstasy.
I lie down in the fields of goldenrod, and everlasting,
Who could find me?
My thoughts simplify.  I have not done a thousand things
or a hundred things but, perhaps, a few.
As for wondering about answers that are not available except
in books, though in my childhood I was sent there
to find them,  I have learned
to leave all that behind
as in summer I take off my shoes and my socks,
my jacket, my hat, and go on
happier, through the fields.  The little sparrow
with the pink beak
calls out, over and over, so simply - not to me
but to the whole world.  All afternoon
I grow wiser, listening to him,
soft, small, nameless fellow at the top of some weed,
enjoying his life.  If you can sing, do it.  If not,
even silence can feel, to the world, like happiness,
like praise,
from the pool of shade you have found beside the everlasting.
Just Lying on the Grass at Blackwater
Mary Oliver (of course - the source of my comfort)

And in my mailbox this morning

What the Day Gives

Suddenly, sun.  Over my shoulder
in the middle of gray November
what I hoped to do comes back,

Across the street the fiery trees
hold onto their leaves,
red and gold in the final months
of this unfinished year,
they offer blazing riddles.

In the frozen fields of my life
there are no shortcuts to spring,
but stories of great birds in migration
carrying small ones on their backs,
predators flying next to warblers
they would, in a different season, eat.

Stunned by the astonishing mix in this uneasy world
that plunges in a single day from despair
to hope and back again, I commend my life
to Ruskin's difficult duty of delight,
and to that most beautiful form of courage,
to be happy.

Jeanne Lohmann

I am thankful for poets who put my thoughts into such beautiful words.....


Barb said...

Your Header is itself a poem, Hildred. I shook my head in such agreement to your poem choices. These lines I'll carry with me: "even silence can feel, to the world, like happiness, like praise." Finding comfort in words - it's something I've done since childhood.

Sallie (FullTime-Life) said...

Thank you for telling me about "A Year of Being Here"... I signed up and it's a wonderful daily gift, but even better to enjoy the poem again here with you. The words that resonated most with me were "...the most beautiful form of courage .. to be happy".

Mary Oliver is a treasure. And I loved your words about her and those thanking the poets.

And Barb is right about your header.