Monday, May 06, 2013

ABC Wednesday
May 8th, 2013

The letter is Q
 
Q is for Quince
 
 
 
Here is the Quince in blossom today along the side garden...



and as it looks in the fall, when it matures to a bright yellow
 
 
The Quince has a romantic history.  A native of Persia, Greece and other Eastern localities it figures
prominently in ancient literature and classical legends....  It is believed in some scriptural circles that the Apple, translated, was the Quince and it is supposed to be the fruit alluded to in the Canticles,

"I sat down under his shadow with great delight and his fruit was sweet to my taste';  and in Proverbs, ' a word fitly spoken is like Apples of gold in pictures of silver.'  The Quince was held sacred to Venus, regarded as a symbol of Love and Happiness. and the 'golden apples' of Virgil are said to be Quinces

All well and good in warm climes where the Quince matures into a soft, juicy fruit, but in colder parts of the world the fruit is hard, more like that of an immature apple or a pear.  The rind is rough and woolly and the flesh harsh and unpalatable with an astringent taste.
 
Not appealing to be eaten out of hand, but perfect for Marmalades or Jelly.
 
Quince Marmalade

Pare and core the Quinces and cut them up, putting them into water as they are cored, to prevent them from blackening.  Put them into a preserving pan with one pound of sugar and one pint of water for every pound of fruit.  Boil over a gentle fire until soft.  Then put them through a sieve, or mash with a spoon, boil up again and tie down in the same way as any other preserve.

In France, before putting the marmalade into pots, a little rosewater and a few grains of musk, mixed together, are added.  (I told you it was a romantic fruit).  This is most delicious and among the French, by whom it is called Cotinat, has a reputation for its digestive powers.  This I learned from Wikipedia....

For more interesting takes on the letter Q visit here at Mrs. Nesbitt's ABC Wednesday, with thanks to her and her Quirky Helpers.

12 comments:

The Weaver of Grass said...

I just adore quice blossom Hildred - it is really the most uplifting colour. I have never tasted the fruit.

uberrhund said...

Lovely flower for the letter "Q". I don't think I have ever seen a Quince in person here in So Cal.
The marmalade sounds sweet and light,very cheery in the Winter and tasty year 'round I would think!

Roger Owen Green said...

Don't think I've ever had it. Should try.
ROG, ABC Wednesday team'

Carver said...

Beautiful shots of the quince in different seasons.

photowannabe said...

My folks had flowering Quince when I was growing up. I always thought it was a beautiful bush.
Thanks for the memories.

LONDONLULU said...

Beautiful shots, and I love the tidbits of story too. These colors are amazing.

magiceye said...

Wow that is fascinating!

Ann said...

How lovely is the Quince flowering, I have never seen it. Will have to start looking for the jelly.
Ann

Shady Gardener said...

How fun. Never seen a quince, that I know of. how does quince marmalade taste?

Gemma Wiseman said...

So long since I tasted some quince! And this post reminded me just how long it has been! Gorgeous photos!

Judy SheldonWalker said...

The photos are so inviting. I have never seen a quince on a tree but have eaten the marmalade.

Sallie (FullTime-Life) said...

The blossoms are beautiful; I think I've seen them without realizing what they were. I know I've never eaten quince jelly. I know now that I want to do so!!