Wednesday, March 07, 2012


Visiting the Garden on the Hill



It was only a short visit, - and very ambivalent.  On the one hand I was thrilled to be there and to see daffodils poking a couple of inches above the ground, but on the other hand my heart sank when I realized how much work awaited to get all that garden tidying done before spring came calling in earnest.

This is a picture of the garden at the beginning of March, last year.  
We had just had a flurry of snow, but it is indicative of 
the tons of debris that need to be cut down and hauled away, - alas!

In my haste to get things done this morning I remembered my gloves and my snippers, but I forgot the camera, or I would show you just how many suckers stand upright in the midst of the Philadelphia Orange;  just how overgrown the climbing roses are and how badly they need to be pruned and tamed;  just how sodden are the leaves that lie over the lily bed and the mess of old stalks that are entangled where the peonies are showing lovely scarlet tips coming through the soil.  Whilst the sweet pea vines,  -  a great heap of crisp, creamy pods and crinkled branches!!!

Eventually I got my mind around this dilemna which involves a lack of time and energy versus the pleasure of being in the garden again, and I decided that I need to hire an intrepid interim gardener for a few days.




I came home with a few budding sticks of forsythia, three bird feeders that had been left amongst the lushness of the garden and a small Chinese pergoda chime.  



Soon we will be enjoying the golden blooms.

For those who might be interested I saw no signs of activity at the Chinese Underground Railway Stations

but no doubt a few days of sunshine will fire up the engines again!

10 comments:

Penny said...

The forsythia looks very cheerful. Not being able to get into the garden lately has been worrying me, but I know that the arthritic bits of me are worse when I try so I am having to rely on the non gardener in the house hold.

The Weaver of Grass said...

I feel the same about our flower garden Hildred. Luckily the farmer helps by doing the hard work and I follow him with my secateurs. However, I am pleased to see that you leave the debris until the Spring rather than cutting it down in the Autumn - it provides such good cover for small animals and insects in the cold weather, apart from food for the birds. Good idea to employ someone to do the really hard work, otherwise you will end up with a sore back.

jane said...

The garden comes up with so many surprises in the Springtime when dead leaves and bits an pieces are removed - it is surely a time for excitement at new finds and the promise of Spring to follow - Jane UK

Sallie (FullTime-Life) said...

The forsythia is wonderful (probably I've already told you that at our house it was known as "ForCynthia" (our daughter). And I remember about the underground railroad ;>)...but I am confused about the garden on the hill. I thought you moved to town?

Hildred and Charles said...

Oh yes, Sallie. We moved to town, but still have the house on the hill where our grandson is living, - means I still have a great affinity with the garden and a great need to keep it looking its loveliest....which means a big spring cleaning job.....

the garden in town is sweet and small, and a piece of cake.

Sallie (FullTime-Life) said...

Thank you Hildred -- now I understand. (And I expect that once you have that hilltop garden whipped into shape for spring you will feel as if you have the best of both worlds!)

Wanda..... said...

Spring is such a lovely time, but here in my garden too, there will soon be so much to do all at once. Thanks for reminding me to cut some forsythia fo inside, Hildred.

Morning's Minion said...

I'm giving serious thought this spring to pacing myself in the gardens. I would happily plant more and more--flowers, vegs,shrubs, herbs--but then it all needs care; my husband only labors with the vegetable garden, the berries and fruit trees. He isn't a weed-on-your-knees sort of person, and my knees aren't what they used to be!
Each plant that unfolds new leaves and buds is such a joy.

Barb said...

Those forsythia! And, I reget to have to tell you, Hildred, that the word on the street is that the Chinese Railroad is relentlessly taking over undercover. (To be politically correct, some people think it has every right...) Glad you paid a visit. Soon enough everything will be ship shape as it always is. I'm in the city and just looking at my small plots gives me qualms about how I'll ever get the debris cleaned away.

Hildred and Charles said...

long sigh, - you are probably right, Barb....